Uncutting

mastera6 submitted:

This might give you a chuckle.

http://www.reddit.com/r/whatisthisthing/comments/22xawz/found_this_in_the_bathroom_at_the_office_what_is/

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Ha, this is awesome! I’m really glad the owner was found. That particular device (the DTR, same one I have) costs about $100. Not something I would want to lose!

For anyone who’s interested, the owner wound up doing an AMA (ask me anything). And apparently the original thread made it onto the front page of Reddit. It’s great to see restoration reaching such a wide audience!

thesubversivesound submitted:

Interesting little article on the Independent to say the least. Thought I’d share the apparent evolution of the phallus with all your followers.

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Definitely interesting to think about! Thanks for showing me.

Uncutting’s FAQ, part two: Foreskin restoration questions

(If you missed part one, on circumcision questions, you can find it here)

Q: You’re what-ing your WHAT?
A:  That’s right, I’m restoring my foreskin! Modern foreskin restoration techniques have been practiced since the 1980s, and it’s estimated that the amount of people who have restored or are restoring is at least in the tens of thousands.

Q: But… why?
A: I don’t like being circumcised due to the numerous drawbacks and the lack of benefits. I elaborate on this here

Q: How are you doing this?
A: Foreskin restoration is done through wearing devices that gently stretch the skin and gradually encourage skin expansion, and/or manual tugging exercises that do the same. I explain the process in more detail here.

Q: There’s no surgery involved?
A: Nope. Surgical foreskin restoration is actually quite rare, and the results are usually less-than-satisfying.

Q: Doesn’t it hurt?
A: Nope! Whether you wear a device or do manual exercises (or both), the key to foreskin restoration is *gentle* tugging, only to the point of feeling mild tension. Restoration should never truly hurt.

Q: Aren’t those devices uncomfortable?
A: I don’t think so, but it really depends on the device (there are about a dozen on the market) and your personal preferences. Personally, I find the devices that use straps around the leg to be uncomfortable, but that’s just me, as thousands of others are fine with those devices. Similarly, not everyone likes the strapless devices, but that’s what I’m comfortable with. And by comfortable, I mean, I really don’t even notice I’m wearing it after a few minutes.

Q: Are they visible under clothing?
A: Not unless you’re wearing something extremely thin or tight. See some pictures here.

Q: What are some examples of these devices?
A: Some of the most popular devices include the TLC TuggerTLC-XDTRCAT II QForeskin Natural Restorer, and ForeBalls. There are plenty of other devices and methods, and you can view a comparison chart of them here.

Q: Which do you use?
A: I started off with the standard TLC Tugger, but found that I personally didn’t like wearing devices that involved straps, so I later switched to the DTR. I also do plenty of manual tugging.

Q: How much do these devices cost?
A: When you factor in shipping, you can get one for as low as about $55 and as much as about $130. The price isn’t really indicative of quality, so don’t feel like you’re buying an inferior product by getting one of the cheaper ones. There’s also the possibility of making a homemade device, and and don’t forget you can restore manually, without a device!

Q: Homemade devices?
A: Yep. Two of these include T-Tape and the pill tube/film canister method. You can read about some others here.

Q: So about manual restoration. What is that like?
A: They’re little exercises that gently tug the penile skin. You do them for a few seconds, and then as many reps as you want, much like regular exercising. You can set aside time during the day to focus on them (i.e. one daily 15-minute session, or two 10-minute sessions every day), and/or you can just do them in little bursts throughout the day. I personally like to tug a little whenever I get dressed, go to the bathroom, or get a shower. For more information on manual tugging, I strongly recommend Restoring Tally’s guide.

Q: But doesn’t it hurt!? Isn’t it uncomfortable!?
A: I told you, they really don’t. Restoring should be painless. You may get a *little* strenuous during manual tugging, but not truly painful.

Q: What’s a retainer, as opposed to a device?
A: A retainer is something you wear to keep the skin over the glans (if you’ve reached the point where you can do that) when you’re not actively restoring, or using your penis for something else. Retaining is important because keeping skin over the glans is what promotes dekeratinization. Retainers are often made from household objects and are very cheap. You can read more about them here. Beware that some retainers are okay to sleep with, while others are NOT. Basically, if there’s a chance the retainer could slide down the penis, don’t sleep with it.

Q: I’ve never even heard of foreskin restoration, is this a common thing? How long have people been doing it?
A: The amount of people who have restored or are restoring their foreskin is estimated to be in the tens of thousands (based on sales figures, members of restoration forums, etc). Although some primitive forms of foreskin restoration existed in the ancient world as well as Nazi Europe, modern foreskin restoration originated in the early 1980s, and has been booming since the late 1990s with the proliferation of the Internet as well as the creation of various commercial  restoration devices. For a more detailed timeline, see my post on the history of foreskin restoration.

Q: And it actually works?
A: Yep! You can find dozens if not hundreds of people’s progress blogs online (mainly on the Foreskin Restoration Network message board), and I happen to have a progress blog of my own as well, documenting through pictures and sometimes video how the skin is grown over time. And this skin growth is indeed beneficial- while it can’t restore all the lost nerve endings cut off with the original foreskin, it returns the penile skin’s mobility that makes sex and masturbation more pleasurable, and and after a while, it increases sensation in the glans and inner foreskin, which are no longer exposed 24/7.

Q: Can a person restore at any age?
A: Yes, though it’s recommended that devices that press down on the glans not be worn by people under 18, just to play it safe. 

Q: How long have you been restoring?
A: I started restoring in the spring of 2010, so a little over two years at the time I’m writing this.

Q: Have you grown much skin?
A: Yep! My glans is now mostly-to-fully covered most of the time when I’m flaccid, particularly when I’m sitting down. If I’m standing (particularly walking) or laying down, it still has a tendency to slide back an uncover the glans every now and then, though. So I still have a long way to go.

Q: Have you regained any sensation/sensitivity?
A: A little so far, but most other restorers have gained even more than me by now. Part of that is due to the fact that I didn’t lose as much to begin with with my circumcision, as I was cut very loosely rather than tightly. Therefore, I had the benefit of mobile skin from the start- kind of like I had a head start on restoration. Now as far as glans sensitivity goes, regaining that requires a lot of consistent retaining when not actively restoring, and most importantly is overnight retaining. Otherwise, nocturnal erections will expose your glans to your clothing/sheets and make it harder for the glans to dekeratinize. However, I’m one of those people who seemingly don’t have much luck with retainers- they all tend to fall all of me fairly easily (unlike devices, which stay on me pretty well), so it’s been hard for me to keep up with retaining. So aside from a slight increase of sensitivity around my corona (rim of the glans), my sensitivity isn’t that much greater yet. But don’t let that discourage you! Like I said, most people have better luck retaining than I do, and  usually regain more sensitivity when they’ve been restoring as long as I have.

Q: How long does foreskin restoration take?
A: It depends on a lot of factors, including how much skin you have to start out with, how much skin you want to end up with, what method(s) you use, how diligent you are in keeping up with it, and natural variation from person to person. I’d say an average time frame is three to seven years if you put in effort every day and stay consistent.

Q: *insert other question about restoration here*
A:  I wrote a post clearing up plenty of common misconceptions about foreskin restoration, you may want to see if I address your question here.

That’s it for part two, if you have any other questions, feel free to ask!

Uncutting’s FAQ, part two: Foreskin restoration questions

(If you missed part one, on circumcision questions, you can find it here)

Q: You’re what-ing your WHAT?
A:  That’s right, I’m restoring my foreskin! Modern foreskin restoration techniques have been practiced since the 1980s, and it’s estimated that the amount of people who have restored or are restoring is at least in the tens of thousands.

Q: But… why?
A: I don’t like being circumcised due to the numerous drawbacks and the lack of benefits. I elaborate on this here

Q: How are you doing this?
A: Foreskin restoration is done through wearing devices that gently stretch the skin and gradually encourage skin expansion, and/or manual tugging exercises that do the same. I explain the process in more detail here.

Q: There’s no surgery involved?
A: Nope. Surgical foreskin restoration is actually quite rare, and the results are usually less-than-satisfying.

Q: Doesn’t it hurt?
A: Nope! Whether you wear a device or do manual exercises (or both), the key to foreskin restoration is *gentle* tugging, only to the point of feeling mild tension. Restoration should never truly hurt.

Q: Aren’t those devices uncomfortable?
A: I don’t think so, but it really depends on the device (there are about a dozen on the market) and your personal preferences. Personally, I find the devices that use straps around the leg to be uncomfortable, but that’s just me, as thousands of others are fine with those devices. Similarly, not everyone likes the strapless devices, but that’s what I’m comfortable with. And by comfortable, I mean, I really don’t even notice I’m wearing it after a few minutes.

Q: Are they visible under clothing?
A: Not unless you’re wearing something extremely thin or tight. See some pictures here.

Q: What are some examples of these devices?
A: Some of the most popular devices include the TLC TuggerTLC-XDTRCAT II QForeskin Natural Restorer, and ForeBalls. There are plenty of other devices and methods, and you can view a comparison chart of them here.

Q: Which do you use?
A: I started off with the standard TLC Tugger, but found that I personally didn’t like wearing devices that involved straps, so I later switched to the DTR. I also do plenty of manual tugging.

Q: How much do these devices cost?
A: When you factor in shipping, you can get one for as low as about $55 and as much as about $130. The price isn’t really indicative of quality, so don’t feel like you’re buying an inferior product by getting one of the cheaper ones. There’s also the possibility of making a homemade device, and and don’t forget you can restore manually, without a device!

Q: Homemade devices?
A: Yep. Two of these include T-Tape and the pill tube/film canister method. You can read about some others here.

Q: So about manual restoration. What is that like?
A: They’re little exercises that gently tug the penile skin. You do them for a few seconds, and then as many reps as you want, much like regular exercising. You can set aside time during the day to focus on them (i.e. one daily 15-minute session, or two 10-minute sessions every day), and/or you can just do them in little bursts throughout the day. I personally like to tug a little whenever I get dressed, go to the bathroom, or get a shower. For more information on manual tugging, I strongly recommend Restoring Tally’s guide.

Q: But doesn’t it hurt!? Isn’t it uncomfortable!?
A: I told you, they really don’t. Restoring should be painless. You may get a *little* strenuous during manual tugging, but not truly painful.

Q: What’s a retainer, as opposed to a device?
A: A retainer is something you wear to keep the skin over the glans (if you’ve reached the point where you can do that) when you’re not actively restoring, or using your penis for something else. Retaining is important because keeping skin over the glans is what promotes dekeratinization. Retainers are often made from household objects and are very cheap. You can read more about them here. Beware that some retainers are okay to sleep with, while others are NOT. Basically, if there’s a chance the retainer could slide down the penis, don’t sleep with it.

Q: I’ve never even heard of foreskin restoration, is this a common thing? How long have people been doing it?
A: The amount of people who have restored or are restoring their foreskin is estimated to be in the tens of thousands (based on sales figures, members of restoration forums, etc). Although some primitive forms of foreskin restoration existed in the ancient world as well as Nazi Europe, modern foreskin restoration originated in the early 1980s, and has been booming since the late 1990s with the proliferation of the Internet as well as the creation of various commercial  restoration devices. For a more detailed timeline, see my post on the history of foreskin restoration.

Q: And it actually works?
A: Yep! You can find dozens if not hundreds of people’s progress blogs online (mainly on the Foreskin Restoration Network message board), and I happen to have a progress blog of my own as well, documenting through pictures and sometimes video how the skin is grown over time. And this skin growth is indeed beneficial- while it can’t restore all the lost nerve endings cut off with the original foreskin, it returns the penile skin’s mobility that makes sex and masturbation more pleasurable, and and after a while, it increases sensation in the glans and inner foreskin, which are no longer exposed 24/7.

Q: Can a person restore at any age?
A: Yes, though it’s recommended that devices that press down on the glans not be worn by people under 18, just to play it safe. 

Q: How long have you been restoring?
A: I started restoring in the spring of 2010, so a little over two years at the time I’m writing this.

Q: Have you grown much skin?
A: Yep! My glans is now mostly-to-fully covered most of the time when I’m flaccid, particularly when I’m sitting down. If I’m standing (particularly walking) or laying down, it still has a tendency to slide back an uncover the glans every now and then, though. So I still have a long way to go.

Q: Have you regained any sensation/sensitivity?
A: A little so far, but most other restorers have gained even more than me by now. Part of that is due to the fact that I didn’t lose as much to begin with with my circumcision, as I was cut very loosely rather than tightly. Therefore, I had the benefit of mobile skin from the start- kind of like I had a head start on restoration. Now as far as glans sensitivity goes, regaining that requires a lot of consistent retaining when not actively restoring, and most importantly is overnight retaining. Otherwise, nocturnal erections will expose your glans to your clothing/sheets and make it harder for the glans to dekeratinize. However, I’m one of those people who seemingly don’t have much luck with retainers- they all tend to fall all of me fairly easily (unlike devices, which stay on me pretty well), so it’s been hard for me to keep up with retaining. So aside from a slight increase of sensitivity around my corona (rim of the glans), my sensitivity isn’t that much greater yet. But don’t let that discourage you! Like I said, most people have better luck retaining than I do, and  usually regain more sensitivity when they’ve been restoring as long as I have.

Q: How long does foreskin restoration take?
A: It depends on a lot of factors, including how much skin you have to start out with, how much skin you want to end up with, what method(s) you use, how diligent you are in keeping up with it, and natural variation from person to person. I’d say an average time frame is three to seven years if you put in effort every day and stay consistent.

Q: *insert other question about restoration here*
A:  I wrote a post clearing up plenty of common misconceptions about foreskin restoration, you may want to see if I address your question here.

That’s it for part two, if you have any other questions, feel free to ask!

Common misconceptions about foreskin restoration

Misconception: "Isn’t that some kind of surgery?"
Actuality: While there is a surgical form of foreskin restoration involving skin grafts, very few people actually choose this method, and even fewer are pleased with the results. When most people talk about foreskin restoration, they are actually referring to a method of stretching that results in skin expansion. This process is done completely by oneself, and only requires one’s hands and an optional (though highly recommended) restoration device one wears on the penis.

Misconception: "Stretching? So doesn’t it just thin out the skin you have left?"
Actuality: No, it ultimately results in skin expansion. The stretching encourages the process of mitosis, in which cells make copies of themselves. Restoration doesn’t just flatten the remaining skin so it covers a larger area, it actually causes the development of new skin tissue, that takes on the properties of the skin it’s being grown from.

Misconception: "Isn’t that really uncomfortable and painful?"
Actuality: Foreskin restoration is not painful at all if done properly, and comfort is a matter of finding a device/method that works for you. While the idea of stretching one’s penile skin may sound painful, the reality is that these devices do not tug the skin to the point of pain. Rather, only a light-to-moderate tension is felt. If one chooses to restore manually (by doing stretches with one’s hands), the tugging still should not be strenuous enough for pain to be felt. In short, if foreskin restoration hurts, you’re doing something wrong. I understand that devices may look intimidating, but I and thousands of others can assure you they are painless and comfortable- I often forget I’m wearing mine.

Misconception: ”Isn’t foreskin restoration just a placebo/purely cosmetic?”
Actuality: Absolutely not. One of the main benefits of foreskin restoration is that it restores the mobility of the skin that is often inhibited or destroyed as a result of circumcision. If you take a look at before-and-after photos of anyone far along in their restoration, you can clearly see the return of this skin. Furthermore, the glans, which develops a layer of keratin (basically a callous) as a result of circumcision, will shed its keratin and regain sensitivity after a period of time. If you think this is merely a placebo, take a closer look at the glans of somebody far along in their restoration- its appearance clearly has much more in common with the shiny, smooth glans of a penis that was never circumcised, rather than the dried-out appearance of the glans of a circumcised penis.

Misconception: "Aren’t some circumcisions just too extreme to restore from?"
Actuality: Nope! While somebody who had a loose circumcision (one that leaves some slack foreskin remnant) has a head-start on restoration, those with tight circumcisions can restore just fine too. The main difference is that they won’t be able to use most devices right away, since they generally require some degree of slack skin. Somebody with a tight circumcision will have to start with manual (by-hand) or taping method until they develop the loose skin needed to wear a device.

Misconception: “Won’t the restored foreskin just be a loose flap of hanging skin?”
Actuality: No. While a restored foreskin tends to be slightly less snug than an original, it still “hugs” the penis, and often even develops a pucker much like an original foreskin has.

Misconception: “Isn’t restoration just not worth it, considering it can’t grow back nerve endings, the ridged bands, or the frenulum if missing?”
Actuality: Sure it’s worth it. Regaining the slack skin tends to be the main benefit in most restorers’ opinions, and this is completely independent of nerve endings or missing structures. Same goes for the increase in glans sensitivity. And let’s not forget that some intact people say their frenulum isn’t as sensitive as others’ seem to be- so even if it’s gone, it’s a part that isn’t necessarily a huge loss. Overall, men that were circumcised in adulthood and then restored (or in other words, have experienced sexual pleasure in all three form of uncut, cut, and restored) typically report that their restored foreskin feels anywhere from 70 to 90% as good as their original foreskin did.

Misconception: “Wouldn’t I have to wear those devices for years and years?”
Actuality: Not necessarily. I’d say 3 to 6 years is a reasonable time frame if you restore consistently. It’s a long process, sure, but it’s not like you have to restore for a significant portion of your life. Once you finish restoring, you’re done.

Misconception: “Doesn’t it take a large chunk out of the day?”
Actuality: Not really. It takes mere seconds to put on a device, and if you choose to do manual sessions, the most time you would spend per day is about 20 minutes, and you can even break them up into smaller sessions.

Misconception: "Aren’t these devices expensive?"
Actuality: You can order a quality device for as low as about $60 and as high as about $130. Sure, they’re not exactly cheap, but that’s still much less expensive than plenty of electronics, for example. There is also the option of making homemade devices, which are just as effective and require much less money. And let’s not forget, manual methods of restoration require only your bare hands.

Misconception: "Wearing a medical device on my penis all the time doesn’t exactly sound sexy."
Actuality: Maybe not, but that doesn’t mean your partner will have a problem with it. Discuss it with them, many people restoring their foreskins have loving, supporting partners who understand that both parties in the relationship stand to benefit from restoration.

Misconception: "I’m too old for foreskin restoration!"
Actuality: I know of an 80-year-old restoring his foreskin. You’re never too old to improve your sexual sensation! 

restoringtally:

Salem-News: Bad Science Doesn’t Justify Male Circumcision
Even  without any clear-cut evidence supporting male infant circumcision,  many still advocate the ancient blood ritual of male genital cutting.  The trend is turning in the United States with fewer infant  circumcisions being performed every year. But far too many still  advocate the old-time cutting of the penis.

restoringtally:

Salem-News: Bad Science Doesn’t Justify Male Circumcision

Even without any clear-cut evidence supporting male infant circumcision, many still advocate the ancient blood ritual of male genital cutting. The trend is turning in the United States with fewer infant circumcisions being performed every year. But far too many still advocate the old-time cutting of the penis.

No more drama. Only penises.

thelilnan:

So here, I’ll share what I learned about circumcision.

During World War I, American Soldiers were circumcised before being deployed to the front-lines because it was thought that it would help prevent venereal diseases that would take valuable medical resources to cure. Men between teen years to 20 and older were having circumcisions, which I expect has to be weird to get used to. When they returned home and had children (baby boys, really) they decided to have their boys circumcised as well, believing it would be in their best interest to get it out of the way early on in case of another draft and war in their lifetime.

The same trend appeared in great Britain during WWI. However, with WWII, many of the countries faced poverty and limited resources, so the percentages of babies being circumcised dropped dramatically, even though having the baby circumcised after birth was part of the free service. Plus, many births were still taking place in the home. Same in America.

However, after WWII, with the economic rise came new companies luring in employees with medical coverage that included, you guessed it, free circumcisions at birth. More and more hospital births began to take place with the companies paying for it, and so at-home births became a sign of low income in America. Circumcisions continued to rise with the availability of hospital care and Dr. Spock’s infamous baby care book, that explicitly advocated the practice.

This, along with Dr. Kellogg’s suggestion of circumcision as an anti-masturbation measure in the late 1800s, greatly contributes to circumcision’s popularity in the US.

breanna182:

denyinghipster:

“San Francisco’s ballot initiative would prohibit circumcision on all males under the age of 18. It would allow no religious exemptions, and it apparently gives no regard to the numerous studies demonstrating that male circumcision can substantially reduce—by more than 50%—the transmission of the HIV virus during sex.”

Diane Cole: Circumcision Saved My Life - WSJ.com

Touching story in favor of circumcision. I also think circumcisions look more normal…maybe it’s just me!

New Study in Kenya finds no association between male circumcision and lowered HIV rates:  Using a population-based survey we examined the behaviors, beliefs, and HIV/HSV-2 serostatus of men and women in the traditionally non-circumcising community of Kisumu, Kenya prior to establishment of voluntary medical male circumcision services. A total of 749 men and 906 women participated. Circumcision status was not associated with HIV/HSV-2 infection nor increased high risk sexual behaviors. In males, preference for being or becoming circumcised was associated with inconsistent condom use and increased lifetime number of sexual partners. Preference for circumcision was increased with understanding that circumcised men are less likely to become infected with HIV.’
 
http://tinyurl.com/3oz3mgw

Doctors Reject Circumcision As HIV Prevention
http://www.drmomma.org/2010/04/doctors-reject-circumcision-as-hiv.html

Quoted straight from this file from USAID, “There appears no clear pattern of association between male circumcision and HIV prevalence—in 8 of 18 countries with data, HIV prevalence is lower among circumcised men, while in the remaining 10 countries it is higher.”
http://www.measuredhs.com/pubs/pdf/CR22/CR22.pdf

“August 17, 2006 — HIV prevalence is not necessarily lower in populations that have higher male circumcision rates, according to findings from a study of African countries presented here at the 16th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2006). The study, which examined the association between male circumcision and HIV infection in 8 Sub-Saharan African countries, contradicts the findings of previous research and the opinion of several prominent personalities active in the fight against AIDS, such as former US President Bill Clinton.”
http://www.docguide.com/male-circumcision-may-not-protect-against-hiv-infection-presented-aids-2006

How the circumcision solution in Africa will increase HIV infections
http://www.publichealthinafrica.org/index.php/jphia/article/view/jphia.2011.e4/html_9

Circumcision is a dangerous distraction in the fight against AIDS. There are six African countries where men are more likely to be HIV positive if they’ve been circumcised: Cameroon, Ghana, Lesotho, Malawi, Rwanda, and Swaziland. Eg in Malawi, the HIV rate is 13.2% among circumcised men, but only 9.5% among intact men. In Rwanda, the HIV rate is 3.5% among circumcised men, but only 2.1% among intact men. If circumcision really worked against AIDS, this just wouldn’t happen. We now have people calling circumcision a “vaccine” or “invisible condom”, and viewing circumcision as an alternative to condoms. The South African National Communication Survey on HIV/AIDS, 2009 found that 15% of adults across age groups “believe that circumcised men do not need to use condoms”.

The one randomized controlled trial into male-to-female transmission showed a 54% higher rate in the group where the men had been circumcised.

ABC (Abstinence, Being faithful, and especially Condoms) is the way forward. Promoting genital surgery will cost African lives, not save them.
Here are some references:

Cameroon
http://www.measuredhs.com/pubs/pdf/FR163/16chapitre16.pdf
table 16.9, p17 (4.1% v 1.1%)
Ghana
http://www.measuredhs.com/pubs/pdf/FR152/13Chapter13.pdf
table 13.9 (1.6% v 1.4%)
Lesotho
http://www.measuredhs.com/pubs/pdf/FR171/12Chapter12.pdf table 12.9 (22.8% v 15.2%)
Malawi
http://www.measuredhs.com/pubs/pdf/FR175/FR-175-MW04.pdf table 12.6, p257 (13.2% v 9.5%)
Rwanda
http://www.measuredhs.com/pubs/pdf/FR183/15Chapter15.pdf , table 15.11 (3.5% v 2.1%)
Swaziland
http://www.measuredhs.com/pubs/pdf/FR202/FR202.pdf table 14.10 (21.8% v 19.5%)

See also
http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=11&abstractId=2197431
“Conclusions: We find a protective effect of circumcision in only one of the eight countries for which there are nationally-representative HIV seroprevalence data. The results are important in considering the development of circumcision-focused interventions within AIDS prevention programs.”

http://apha.confex.com/apha/134am/techprogram/paper_136814.htm
“Results: … No consistent relationship between male circumcision and HIV risk was observed in most countries.”


“Male Circumcision – A Dangerous Mistake in the HIV Battle” http://www.intactamerica.org/dangerousmistake

The latest “studies” are based on hypotheses that have been long since debunked. As of yet, there hasn’t yet been a single explanation as to how exactly removing the foreskin “reduces the risk” of HIV infection, only assertion that it just “does.”

Myth#1: “The Langerhans cells facilitate HIV infection. Circumcision ‘reduces the risk of HIV’ by removing the Langerhans cells in the foreskin.”

Reality: Langerhans cells are found all over the body; their removal is virtually impossible.


AND

“Langerin is a natural barrier to HIV-1 transmission by Langerhans cells”
http://www.circumcisionand
hiv.com/files/de_Witte_2007.pdf

Myth#2: “Circumcision ‘reduces the risk of HIV’ because it’s harder for the virus to get through the keratinized glans.”

“CONCLUSION: We found no difference between the keratinization of the inner and outer aspects of the adult male foreskin. Keratin layers alone are unlikely to explain why uncircumcised men are at higher risk for HIV infection.”
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20098294

STUDY: HIV-1 Interactions and Infection in Adult Male Foreskin Explant Cultures - “No difference can be clearly visualized between the inner and outer foreskin.”
http://retroconference.org/2009/PDFs/502.pdf

According to Malaysian AIDS Council vice-president Datuk Zaman Khan, more than 70% of the 87,710 HIV/AIDS sufferers in the country are Muslims (where all men are circumcised). In Malaysia, most, if not all Muslim men are circumcised, whereas circumcision is uncommon in the non-Muslim community. This means that HIV is spreading in the community where most men are circumcised at an even faster rate, than in the community where most men are intact
http://www.mmail.com.my/content/39272-72-percent-aidshiv-sufferers-malaysia-are-muslims-says-council
______________________________________________________________________
Why do the WHO and CDC focus so much on three unfinished RCT’s of female-to-male transmission, but ignore male-to-female-transmission?

This 1993 study found that “partner circumcision” was “strongly associated with HIV-1 infection [in women] even when simultaneously controlling for other covariates.”
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/23/2/371

The Wawer study showed a 54% higher rate of male-to-female transmission in the group where the men had been circumcised. The figures were too small to show statistical significance, but there will be no larger scale study to find out if circumcising men increases the risk to women. Somehow that’s considered unethical, yet it’s considered ethical to promote male circumcision whilst not knowing if the risk to women is increased (by 54%?, 25%?, 80%? - who knows?)
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(09)60998-3/abstract


‎”After years of circumcising young men, the HIV infection rate in Swaziland has gone up, not down as predicted. This data is from a 2007 Swaziland health department report, which the government has had for three years, but continues to circumcise men anyway.”
 
Just sayin’.